Timeline Editor

20052006201620172018
  • Two falcons, a male and a female, try to establish a nest on the 14th floor ledge of the 17-story County Courthouse in midtown Elizabeth.
  • Leg bands reveals that the female was born in Jersey City and the male was born in Connecticut.
  • The choice of location in the center of a bustling mid-sized city may seem odd, but they are likely attracted by the height of the ledge and the ample supply of prey nearby.
  • Unfortunately, windy conditions are an obstacle and the attempt is unsuccessful.
  • Acting on the guidance of wildlife experts with the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, County and State workers install a repurposed igloo-style dog house on the west side of the Courthouse roof to protects eggs and chicks from the elements.
  • Falcons have successfully raised chicks in the same nest every year from 2006 to 2016.
  • Sometime during this period an unbanded male replaced the banded male from Connecticut.
  • February 2016: Two webcams are installed at the nest by Union County with guidance from the New Jersey Division of Fish & Wildlife and Conserve Wildlife Foundation. One is located inside the nest box and the other is fixed on an outside railing to capture nesting, hatching and fledgling behaviors. The outer camera can be moved by remote control, and the inner camera includes an infrared feature for night viewing.
  • At some point during 2016 the Jersey City female is replaced by a banded six- year-old female. She was born at Throg’s Neck Bridge in New York City. 
  • Spring 2016: The pair raise three hatchlings from four eggs. 
  • Summer 2016: A banded chick from Union County’s 2016 clutch is found dead in Key West, Florida. The probable cause of death is electrocution due to contact with power lines, a common source of bird mortality.
  • September 2016: Union County signs a Memorandum of Understanding with Conserve Wildlife Foundation for the purpose of “educating the public about peregrine falcons, their habitats and the importance of protecting rare species of wildlife.
  • Fall 2016:  A third camera is installed on the Courthouse roof to track activity on the east side of the courthouse roof.
  • December 25, 2016: The Throg’s Neck female is seen on camera for the last time.
  • December 28, 2016: An unbanded female replaces the Throg’s Neck female.
  • February 2017: The male falcon and the unbanded female continue to bond at the nest site. Video 1 | Video 2
  • Late February: A second female is spotted on the falcon cam. This female has a leg band identifying her as 91/BA, who came to Union County all the way from Rochester, New York. Drama ensues as she attempts to claim the nest site. This distraction could possibly cause a delay in mating and breeding. Video
  • March 22: The unbanded female lays her first egg.
  • March 25: The unbanded female lays her second egg
  • March-April: After a protracted battle 91/BA establishes claim over the nest. 
  • Earth Day — April 22: At approximately 1:59 p.m. 91/BA lays an egg of her own, making a total of three in the nest.
  • April 24 and April 27: 91/BA lays two more eggs, for a total of five. The male and 91/BA are sharing incubation duties for all five eggs together.
  • May 8: All five eggs are still being incubated together but the two older eggs were expected to hatch over the weekend. They are now considered nonviable, most likely due to inconsistent incubation during the territorial battle between the unbanded female and 91/BA.
  • May 30 and 31: The first (video) and second eggs successfully hatch. The parents are busy feeding the two young “eyas” (video) while continuing to incubate the three remaining eggs.
  • March 29: At approximately 7:46 a.m., our female falcon, 91/BA lays her first egg. Incubation begins after the last egg is laid.  The next egg is expected late on March 30th/31st.
  • March 31: Right on schedule, a second egg arrives at 4:57 p.m. on Saturday, March 31.
  • April 3: The third egg is hatched on the morning of April 3 and a fourth egg is hatched a few days later.
  • May 29:  The four chicks are in good health and they are beginning to venture a few steps out of the nest. On May 29 they received leg bands from personnel with NJ DEP and Conserve Wildlife.